The Cherokee and the Slave

Home Background Blog CENERAP About..Author

HISTORICAL NOVEL BY SAMUEL H. JOHNSON


One day, someone will come and take you where you do not choose to go.  (From John 21:18)

That is what happened to thirteen thousand Cherokees in 1838.

Now available on Amazon.com Kindle Reader!

Go to Amazon.com or click HERE to download THE CHEROKEE AND THE SLAVE to your KINDLE, computer, tablet or other reading device. Thank you for visiting this website: THE CHEROKEE AND THE SLAVE.

The website is under development. Please revisit again soon for more information and upcoming features, including:

  • Blog
  • Articles
  • Links 

Chapter Headings you will find in the book:

  1. The Cherokee
  2. Eagle Hunter's First Slaves
  3. The Runaway
  4. They are Hungry for our Land
  5. The Cabin Boy
  6. The Train!
  7. The Cherokee and the Slave
  8. The Slaves
  9. One Very Stubborn Civilized Tribe
  10. The Cherokee, Just Another Indian
  11. General Winfield Scott and the Militia
  12. Indian Removal
  13. The Cherokee and the Slave
  14. The Decision
  15. Summer of Danger-Summer of Fear
  16. Escape From Alabama
  17. The Trail of Tears
  18. Oklahoma Territory
  19. Escape From Alabama?
  20. A Most Un-Civil War
  21. Reunited Again: The Cherokee and the Slave
  22. No More Trails, No More Tears 

 

Cherokee farmers bought and owned Black slaves! 

Most American history books skip right over that story. In an effort to retain traditional homes in the southeastern states, some members of the "Five Civilized Tribes" imitated their white neighbors in every possible way, including the ownership of slaves.

Then something happened; something that was to change the lives of the Cherokee Nation forever.

In 1838, armed U.S. militia routed thirteen thousand Cherokee men, women and children from their homes in Georgia and Tennessee. "Indian Removal" meant forcing the Cherokees to travel 800 miles westward to the Oklahoma Territory along the tragic route that came to be known as the "Trail of Tears."

Some of the Cherokee families took their slaves with them.

Eagle Hunter is a slave owner on his farm in northern Georgia.

Amanda is a young slave, a housemaid on a plantation in northern Alabama.

THE CHEROKEE AND THE SLAVE is their story. 

Surprised!? I was shocked to discover that some Cherokee farmers bought and owned slaves. My second shock came when I learned that when the Cherokee families were ejected from their homes and forced to travel west, some Cherokee men escaped near my home town, Florence, Alabama.

What if ...What if one of the Cherokee escapees encountered my great-great-grandparents, the slaves Louis and Amanda? Sounded like a good story to me, especially when my long-time friend, Dr. Shirley J. Jones, State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany, convinced me that this could be the focal point of a very informative novel. Note: Dr. Shirley J. Jones is Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the New York State public institution that now is referred to as "University at Albany" or "UAlbany."

 

JUDGE RULES! CHEROKEE FREEDMEN WIN TRIBAL CITIZENSHIP

The long fight is over!  On Wednesday, August 39, 2017 the long series of legal battles in the United States courts ended with a resounding win for the descendants of slaves who were owned by members of the Cherokee Nation. U.S. District Judge Thomas F. Hogan ruled that the 1866 post-Civil War treaty guarantees citizenship to the former slaves, the "Cherokee Freedmen," and by extension, to their descendants.  The long-sought ruling means that 28,000 Freedmen can enjoy the full rights of citizenship that the case, CHEROKEE NATION v. NASH requested.

The Cherokee Nation Registration Office in Talequah, Oklahoma is now accepting citizenship applications. 

 

THE SUPREME COURT OF THE CHEROKEE NATION MAY HAVE A DIFFERENT IDEA ABOUT SLAVERY

04/11/2021

VIA E-MAIL